Scotts Filter

Sidecar Flip

Living Legend
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
6,359
Location
20150 Mc Carty Rd. Deerfield, Michigan 49238
That is a nice look'in unit. Needs no chrome can to cover it up......I can see the pleasureability in it.:eek:

We still need that time duration first article test though. I can read all the hype that drummers of a certain product spew, but just one sentence of praise or criticism from someone who has actually used a particular product negates all the rhetoric for me.:bch:
 

HeR3tic

Living Legend
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
3,460
Location
Heart of Dixie (Alabama)
Is it brass or bronze used in bushings or bearings. I suspect the latter. Both of which would also fail the "rare earth" attraction.

Did my first oil change and there was a tad bit of one or the other which drain out of the dry sump area. Someone explain to me how pumping out of a dry area works. There certainly wasn't much drain from either the fore and aft drain.

Any additional shavings/splinters should be collected in the Scotts. For sure those particles were collectable by even the worst paper filter but there they were in the dry sump area. Keep in mind that my Scotts filter and only 45 miles since it's install. Patience...patience.
 

Sidecar Flip

Living Legend
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
6,359
Location
20150 Mc Carty Rd. Deerfield, Michigan 49238
Someone explain to me how pumping out of a dry area works.

From the shop manual:

"The Rocket3 utilises a dry sump lubrication system whereby a pressure pump takes oil from an oil tank and delivers oil under pressure to the engine and transmission." ----That's why it's important not to coast the bike downhill without the engine running. transmission bearings are starved for oil----"A scavenge pump collects oil from the sump and returns it to the oil tank.

"The oil tank is attached to the upper crankcase on the left side of the motorcycle. Situated within the lower crankcase, the pressure pump is gravity fed from the oil tank via an internal drilling. An oil tank drain plug is situated at the lowest point in the drilling, in the sump itself."

Contrary to some belief's, there is an "oil non-return valve" located in the lower crankcase which prevents oil from draining from the tank while the engine isn't running. Always, before you check your oil level, you need to run the bike for a minute or so and then check the oil which is just the opposite of a car or bike with a wet sump. Checking the oil after a period of non-use could result in a false reading if the non return valve is leaking and possible over filling of the lubrication system.

You read this BART??

Actually, the system is very similar to the older Meriden bikes except the Meriden bikes had a piston pump (one) instead of the R3's twin rotary pumps. The meriden pumps had a scavenge side and a pressure side siamesed together if you will.
 

Pig9r

Living Legend
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
4,848
Location
Kansas City, MO USA
The meriden pumps had a scavenge side and a pressure side siamesed together if you will.

And if I remember correctly the scavenge side is bigger in diameter to prevent from pumping the oil tank dry.
 

Sidecar Flip

Living Legend
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
6,359
Location
20150 Mc Carty Rd. Deerfield, Michigan 49238
Pig9r:

I believe you are right. My factory Shop Manual for the T120 is in the upstairs library (nice way to say it's packed away in the attic). Remember the oil filter...a brass screen similar to the Scott Filter, just much smaller and the air filters.....gauze over wire screen. Not much restriction there, not even for pea gravel.:D

Those were the days.....
 

Pig9r

Living Legend
Joined
Mar 5, 2006
Messages
4,848
Location
Kansas City, MO USA
I added an oil filter to mine ('70 T120R). Takes the same cartridge as the Tridents did. Also have electronic ignition, mikuni carbs, solid state rectifier and voltage regulator, led tail light, halogen headlight, all while maintaining the original look. Oh and I have stainless spokes laced by Tom.:cool: I am thinking hard about selling it though.

The sludge trap that runs through the crank was the "secondary filtration" system.
 

Sidecar Flip

Living Legend
Joined
Jul 16, 2006
Messages
6,359
Location
20150 Mc Carty Rd. Deerfield, Michigan 49238
Young guy....Old bike

I added an oil filter to mine ('70 T120R). Takes the same cartridge as the Tridents did. Also have electronic ignition, mikuni carbs, solid state rectifier and voltage regulator, led tail light, halogen headlight, all while maintaining the original look. Oh and I have stainless spokes laced by Tom.:cool: I am thinking hard about selling it though.

The sludge trap that runs through the crank was the "secondary filtration" system.

Geese Dad, you took all the nostalgia away. Electronic ignition, no points (I always liked to have the points cover off while the engine was running and watch the little blue sparks dance across the contacts). Mickey Rooney carbs (Something inspiring about Amal Concentrics...spend all day polishing the cases and then pee gas all over the polished cases with the float bowl ticklers), been there, done that. Solid state rectifier and regulator (I fondly remember the smoke coming from under the seat as the Lucas rectifier turned toaster and roasted the Zerner Diode under the headlight more than once). My new Bonnie has it's solid state rectification/regulation package mounted in the same place, for looks I imagine. Led tail light..I hope it's in the Lucas housing. Any less would be an abortion. Halogen headlight...That is an outright abortion. The dim Lucas candle made night rides daring. That's what biking is all about, especially on a Brit bike. You never get "sludge" on 50 weight Quaker State, it's all paraffin to begin with.

All-in-all, you managed to muddy up a proper Brit bike for the sake of dependability. You should be ashamed.:D

My new T100 has stainless spokes as they all do, and they seem to be breaking on a number of new Bonnies.

I didn't know Tom laced wheels. Is he a part time employee of Buchanan's?

I'd consider installing a set of Trident silencers on the R3. That would be nostalgia at it's best.
 

HeR3tic

Living Legend
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
3,460
Location
Heart of Dixie (Alabama)
From the shop manual:

"The Rocket3 utilises a dry sump lubrication system whereby a pressure pump takes oil from an oil tank and delivers oil under pressure to the engine and transmission." ----That's why it's important not to coast the bike downhill without the engine running. transmission bearings are starved for oil----"A scavenge pump collects oil from the sump and returns it to the oil tank.

"The oil tank is attached to the upper crankcase on the left side of the motorcycle. Situated within the lower crankcase, the pressure pump is gravity fed from the oil tank via an internal drilling. An oil tank drain plug is situated at the lowest point in the drilling, in the sump itself."

Contrary to some belief's, there is an "oil non-return valve" located in the lower crankcase which prevents oil from draining from the tank while the engine isn't running. Always, before you check your oil level, you need to run the bike for a minute or so and then check the oil which is just the opposite of a car or bike with a wet sump. Checking the oil after a period of non-use could result in a false reading if the non return valve is leaking and possible over filling of the lubrication system.

You read this BART??

Actually, the system is very similar to the older Meriden bikes except the Meriden bikes had a piston pump (one) instead of the R3's twin rotary pumps. The meriden pumps had a scavenge side and a pressure side siamesed together if you will.

Several excellent advisories here.
Thanks:D
 

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