Is fork dipping when front brakes applied at very slow speed normal?

Tripps

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I rode a Saxxon Motodd(Telelever) equipped BMW R1100 120,000 miles before needing to replace its single spring-over-shock shock absorber. And NO other related maintenance was ever required.
I still ride a 2006 manufactured K1200R Hossack(Duo-lever) equipped BMW, and the 'Non-diving', bump-steer immune front suspension performs as good as the day I purchased it 62,000 miles ago.
greatly improved handling at ALL speeds.

Why I show up at the Rocket Rallies on my K1200 now. Never felt another suspension that was within a mile of equal.
 

Joesmoe

IMOKUR2
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If you have a decent suspension shop, I can recommend the RaceTech gold valve emulators I had installed on my bike, with springs to match and 15W oil.

Was night and day different for the better.

Note, these are only available on the Touring.
 

Claviger

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Keep in mind everyone, the R3T and R3/R3C/R3S/R3R are two very different front suspensions.

R3T - Damping Rod
R3(all others) - Cartridge

I have found that the Wilbers front springs, 10w, and 100mm air gap performs very very well, it doesn't dive excessively under braking and doesn't crush excessively while cornering fast, while retaining a very plush front end feel for the first bit of travel to even out the feeling of smaller stuff.

Hossack vs Telescopic - There are very good reasons to stick with telescopic forks vs any variant of the lever front ends, the main ones being feedback and weight. When the cutting edge, best performing, highest tech hyper bikes change, I'll sit up and pay attention.
 

warp9.9

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Why I show up at the Rocket Rallies on my K1200 now. Never felt another suspension that was within a mile of equal.
No its because the bmw is lighter and easier to pick up.
images.jpeg
 

barbagris

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Hossack vs Telescopic - There are very good reasons to stick with telescopic forks vs any variant of the lever front ends, the main ones being feedback and weight. When the cutting edge, best performing, highest tech hyper bikes change, I'll sit up and pay attention.
Rob - I have ridden with Hossack, Difazio and various other types. I almost had Mr Difazio make me a front end for my Guzzi. The main reasons why telescopic live on are aesthetics, consumer conservatism and industry interest.

i.e. Last thing Ohlins wants to see is a set of cheepo forks and some simple shocks thrash their forks. Getting Ohlins to sponsor you on publicity builds is a cinch. Ride a set of good short leading links forks and you'll yearn for them. There is a place in Italy making CNC Hossack front ends. Several fork mfrs have tried to buy them out - to kill them off.
 

FR56

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[QUOTE="Claviger,
Hossack vs Telescopic - There are very good reasons to stick with telescopic forks vs any variant of the lever front ends, the main ones being feedback and weight. When the cutting edge, best performing, highest tech hyper bikes change, I'll sit up and pay attention.[/QUOTE]

Until 'variable ratio steering' was introduced into automobiles; driving a Ferrari in town was similar to steering a 10 wheel dump truck. Parellel parking was simply NOT attempted. Similarly you don't put 'Drag-bars' or clip-ons on a motocrosser. Neither the R3 nor the Goldwing nor the greater majority of 'heavyweight' motorcycles are "cutting edge, highest tech hyper bikes". None of those buyers are going to be concerned with the esoteric levels of "feed back" desired when banked at 45 degrees at tripple digit speeds. R1s and Ducati Panagalis you obviously want 100% 'feel' and the lightest of weight. But a couple more pounds and the ability to NOT upset the entire chassis when casually banking into a corner, or have the bars near torn from your hands while traversing a badly potholed parking lot is far more practicle "performance" for the vast majority of riders.
 

Claviger

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Careful with absolutes like “none”. We ride and love a bike that is a niche within a niche. There’s bound to be a few who want to do ‘Go their own way’.

I, for one, want every bit of feel and feedback possible, diving while braking is such a non issue with proper forks I don’t even notice it anymore.

Not sure what you mean about upset the chassis when casually diving into a corner.

The levered fronts are great tech, but they’re not for everyone on every bike.
 
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rocketjohn

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was a 2013 Triumph Rocket 3 Touring
As long as you know what to expect from your bike when you do a certain move you can ride it well. Granted some oddities are untenable and there is the reason the aftermarket is ready with parts aplenty. Having a touring Rocket means I am not exactly trying to straighten curves, but curves are what we got around here...I just use an appropriate entry speed and it handles fine....if the front end wants to mush....I wouldn't know...I don't ride it hard enough to find out! But I ride it hard enough to know that it's capable of more than I can pry out of it.
 
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