1K9

Big Cruisers 4 Me
Joined
May 24, 2016
Messages
3,909
Location
Clear Lake / Houston, Texas
Ride
2007 Rocket III
Thanks. I will check out a video or two.
I don't think my 06 has abs
It is obvious if it does. If the bike is that old and well ridden you will notice a very big improvement. Better than when you got the bike. Don't drop junk into the reservoir when removing the top cover. Cover the gas tank and fender with towels and rags. Drain or flush well all the old brake fluid from the brake lines. Keep brake pads off till after installing the tyre. Avoid contamination or damage to the new pads splaying them open to install the tyre. Some people de-glaze the rotor with fine steel wool and brake spray cleaner. Use anti-vibration grease on the back of the pads so they don't squeal. Final torque the front calipers while some brake is applied. This might save a front wobble when braking.
When your done, do the back. The back brake get hot faaast if it drags. I use the back brake a lot to control the bike in the turns. Once the rear tyre is off, remove the final drive. Clean and lube the splines. Very fine steel wool/clean the rim and treat with modern stuff. It depends on how dirty your rim is. Your choice.
All this is fun and ezzy day project. 3 to 400$ at the shop.

IMG_0576.JPGIMG_0607.JPGIMG_0618.JPGIMG_0617.JPGIMG_0616.JPGIMG_0615.JPG IMG_0575.JPG
 

TURBO200R4

stand up straight and grab the world by the a$$
Joined
Jan 24, 2013
Messages
6,930
Location
TUCSON AZ
Ride
07 rocket III classic
when my front brakes had air all i did was pry the pads in then apply a couple of times then i had a good pedal and could stop on a dime.
 

kenne

Turbocharged
Joined
Sep 3, 2016
Messages
551
Location
Gold Coast, Australia
Ride
05 Rocket iii Rat
Mate just did mine yesterday this is what i did before i go and buy seal kits

1. Unbolt 1 front brake assembly
2. Take out brake pads and give the brake lever a pump you will probably see maybe one piston come out maybe 2 maybe none if your brakes are really unresponsive
3. Clamp 3 of the the pistons in the caliper and pump your brake lever this will force one piston out don't pump to far though.
4. Clean piston then lubricate and gently push back into caliper
5 Repeat on each individual piston keeping the other three clamped until all are done
6 Re bolt caliper back with pads inserted and repeat on other side caliper
7 Gently squeeze brake lever till it stiffens up ( talking about the brake lever) if it doesn't stiffen you may need to re bleed your brakes

i gave mine a bleed anyway topping up the fluid, brakes were heaps tighter after the clean and even better after the bleed. if that still doesn't solve it you may need to take the whole caliper assembly off and redo seals

hope this helps
 

1K9

Big Cruisers 4 Me
Joined
May 24, 2016
Messages
3,909
Location
Clear Lake / Houston, Texas
Ride
2007 Rocket III
Mate just did mine yesterday this is what i did before i go and buy seal kits

1. Unbolt 1 front brake assembly
2. Take out brake pads and give the brake lever a pump you will probably see maybe one piston come out maybe 2 maybe none if your brakes are really unresponsive
3. Clamp 3 of the the pistons in the caliper and pump your brake lever this will force one piston out don't pump to far though.
4. Clean piston then lubricate and gently push back into caliper
5 Repeat on each individual piston keeping the other three clamped until all are done
6 Re bolt caliper back with pads inserted and repeat on other side caliper
7 Gently squeeze brake lever till it stiffens up ( talking about the brake lever) if it doesn't stiffen you may need to re bleed your brakes

i gave mine a bleed anyway topping up the fluid, brakes were heaps tighter after the clean and even better after the bleed. if that still doesn't solve it you may need to take the whole caliper assembly off and redo seals

hope this helps
Kenne, sounds like your approach should work. The pistons collect crud and require polishing and lubing with Brembo red grease. It depends on your riding conditions and habits cleaning the bike. Sometimes just exercising the pistons, like Turbo has stated, works. In my case, the rear caliper had just one of the pistons barely working and keeping the pads engaged, cooking the rear rotor. Once I discovered and fixed that, I went ahead and serviced the fronts. Trouble starts when the rider trusts the shop and during brake service they just change the pads, bleed the brakes and send you off. At the time of pad replacement a careful inspection and off-the-bike cleaning of the caliper should always be done. Grater trouble arises when the seals are reinserted in the incorrect position allowing fluid to escape and contaminate the pad leading to catastrophic brake failure. This is why Brembo no longer sells seal kits. Kenne, to that effect your method avoids that fatal error. Some vouch for deglazing the rotors, which I have never done. Squealing was cured with special purpose, high heat grease applied to the back of the pads.

Your Rocket should stop with a single finger squeeze. If it don't, have your calipers carefully inspected by a serious reputable mechanic or yourself. Get a torque wrench, a set of metric sockets, a way to lift the front of the bike and have some fun servicing your bike.

Good subject to converse about. It might save a fellow rider's life.
 

Ddodge80

.020 Over
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
27
Ride
06 rocket3
Kenne, sounds like your approach should work. The pistons collect crud and require polishing and lubing with Brembo red grease. It depends on your riding conditions and habits cleaning the bike. Sometimes just exercising the pistons, like Turbo has stated, works. In my case, the rear caliper had just one of the pistons barely working and keeping the pads engaged, cooking the rear rotor. Once I discovered and fixed that, I went ahead and serviced the fronts. Trouble starts when the rider trusts the shop and during brake service they just change the pads, bleed the brakes and send you off. At the time of pad replacement a careful inspection and off-the-bike cleaning of the caliper should always be done. Grater trouble arises when the seals are reinserted in the incorrect position allowing fluid to escape and contaminate the pad leading to catastrophic brake failure. This is why Brembo no longer sells seal kits. Kenne, to that effect your method avoids that fatal error. Some vouch for deglazing the rotors, which I have never done. Squealing was cured with special purpose, high heat grease applied to the back of the pads.

Your Rocket should stop with a single finger squeeze. If it don't, have your calipers carefully inspected by a serious reputable mechanic or yourself. Get a torque wrench, a set of metric sockets, a way to lift the front of the bike and have some fun servicing your bike.

Good subject to converse about. It might save a fellow rider's life.
Lots of great advise i belive i will be taking a Saturday off work to service my calipers
 
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