Weeping Bleeder Screw Rear Calliper Fix

Tonester

#justsayin'
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
92
Location
NSW Australia
Ride
2014 Triumph Rocket III Roadster
Hi Chaps,
after changing to Footboards on my 2014 R3R recently I came into my workshop this morning to be greeted by this!:eek::eek::eek:

IMG_0907.JPG


I'm like... What the??? There's no way I would have over tightened the Bleed Screw. After doing a bit of research, I was surprised that some people were suggesting that the Caliper would need replacing and that this was the only option... (yeah right). Either that or huge adaptors that looked like gas fittings!:sick::banghead::sick: However, I came across a kit that you can buy that works the same way as 'Time-sert' inserts by replacing damaged or stripped threads by drilling and tapping the Bleed Screw hole with the special stepped drill and tap supplied with the kit. Here's the link:
Nipple Therapy Kit
I still had a feeling that there must be an easier way... especially as I had just watched "Apollo 13" a couple of days ago :roll::roll::roll: (Think man THINK!)... This is what I came up with;

NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE ABS GET YOUR BRAKES SERVICED AND CHECKED BY A CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL...

1) After checking that the threads on the Caliper and Bleed Screw were clean and undamaged, I reasoned that it must be the Seat in the Caliper, where the Bleed Screw sits to create a seal. 99 times out of a hundred it's a simple and effective design that works well; however, sometimes they can be very temperamental and unforgiving, especially if you're a bit heavy handed on the tools - Caliper Aluminium 0, Steel Bleed Screw 1 - This can damage the 'Seating Face' in the Caliper allowing brake fluid to flow up and in-between the threads of the Bleeder and the Caliper resulting in the constant 'weeping' (literally).

2) I cleaned up the 45 degree chamfer on the Bleed Screw. VERY, VERY lightly using 2000 grade wet and dry and brake fluid and a bloody big magnifying lens/light

3) I measured the internal diameter of the bore where the Bleeder Valve screws into on the Caliper (6.72mm). My idea was to turn a pin that would fit the bore, with almost an interference fit with the highest point of the threads in the bore. I could use the bore as a guide for my turned pin to keep it 'true'/perpendicular to the Seating Face.

4) I turned up a pin with a 45 degree end that I then finished, polished - I considered heat treating the end but as I was using it on Aluminium it wasn't necessary.

IMG_0912.JPG


5) I then used 'Autosol' as a lapping paste (I've used toothpaste before and it works very well). I was very careful to use only small amounts and take it very slowly. I made sure that the bore and Seating Face was spotless before I put the Bleed Valve back in, using dry cotton buds (my Mrs. has got some really good ones that have two different ends - round and pointed.) They are excellent for getting into tight spots. I then cleaned the bore out with fresh brake fluid. I wasn't too concerned about any 'Autosol' going down the hole of the bore as it's fairly viscous and I was OCD x 10 about how much I was using. This combined with flushing the system, I was confident that it would be OK.

IMG_0913.JPG


After bolting everything up and re-bleeding the rear brake system, I am happy to report that It was 100% successful :thumbsup::thumbsup:

IMG_0920.JPG


Cheers
T.
Oh! By the way. can anyone tell me the size and thread pitch of the FRONT Bleeder Screws/Valves. Thanks - (The rear Bleeder Screw/Valve is M8x1.25)
 
Last edited:

Rocket3Pilot

Supercharged
Joined
Jul 23, 2015
Messages
475
Location
Waynesboro Virginia
Ride
2013 Rocket III Roadster
Hi Chaps,
after changing to Footboards on my 2014 R3R recently I came into my workshop this morning to be greeted by this!:eek::eek::eek:

View attachment 44249

I'm like... What the??? There's no way I would have over tightened the Bleed Screw. After doing a bit of research, I was surprised that some people were suggesting that the Calliper would need replacing and that this was the only option... (yeah right). Either that or huge adaptors that looked like gas fittings!:sick::banghead::sick: However, I came across a kit that you can buy that works the same way as 'Time-sert' inserts by replacing damaged or stripped threads by drilling and tapping the Bleed Screw hole with the special stepped dill and tap supplied with the kit. Here's the link:
Nipple Therapy Kit
I still had a feeling that there must be an easier way... especially as I had just watched "Apollo 13" a couple of days ago :roll::roll::roll: (Think man THINK!)... This is what I came up with;

NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE ABS GET YOUR BRAKES SERVICED AND CHECKED BY A CERTIFIED PROFESIONAL...

1) After checking that the threads on the Calliper and Bleed Screw were clean and undamaged, I reasoned that it must be the Seat in the Calliper, where the Bleed Screw sits to create a seal. 99 times out of a hundred it's a simple and effective design that works well; however, sometimes they can be very temperamental and unforgiving, especially if you're a bit heavy handed on the tools - Calliper Aluminium 0, Steel Bleed Screw 1 - This can damage the 'Seating Face' in the Calliper allowing brake fluid to flow up and in-between the threads of the Bleeder and the Calliper resulting in the constant 'weeping' (literally).

2) I cleaned up the 45 degree chamfer on the Bleed Screw. VERY, VERY lightly using 2000 grade wet and dry and brake fluid and a bloody big magnifying lens/light

3) I measured the internal diameter of the bore where the Bleeder Valve screws into on the Calliper (6.72mm). My idea was to turn a pin that would fit the bore, with almost an interference fit with the highest point of the threads in the bore. I could use the bore as a guide for my turned pin to keep it 'true'/perpendicular to the Seating Face.

4) I turned up a pin with a 45 degree end that I then finished, polished - I considered heat treating the end but as I was using it on Aluminium it wasn't necessary.

View attachment 44252

5) I then used 'Autosol' as a lapping paste (I've used toothpaste before and it works very well). I was very careful to use only small amounts and take it very slowly. I made sure that the bore and Seating Face was spotless before I put the Bleed Valve back in, using dry cotton buds (my Mrs. has got some really good ones that have two different ends - round and pointed. They are excellent for getting into tight spots. I then cleaned the bore out with fresh brake fluid. I wasn't too concerned about any 'Autosol' going down the hole of the bore as it's fairly viscous and I was OCD x 10 about how much I was using. This combined with flushing the system, I was confident that it would be OK.

View attachment 44256

After bolting everything up and re-bleeding the rear brake system, I am happy to report that It was 100% successful :thumbsup::thumbsup:

View attachment 44253

Cheers
T.
Oh! By the way. can anyone tell me the size and thread pitch of the FRONT Bleeder Screws/Valves. Thanks - (The rear Bleeder Screw/Valve is M8x1.25)

Great idea and write-up, thanks. I moved recently and had to give up my mill and lathe, boy do I miss them.:( I almost always used them to make tools or jigs to fix sh*t.
 

Bigj1955

.040 Over
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
64
Location
Gaffney, SC
Ride
2016 Rocket 3 Roadster
Hi Chaps,
after changing to Footboards on my 2014 R3R recently I came into my workshop this morning to be greeted by this!:eek::eek::eek:

View attachment 44249

I'm like... What the??? There's no way I would have over tightened the Bleed Screw. After doing a bit of research, I was surprised that some people were suggesting that the Caliper would need replacing and that this was the only option... (yeah right). Either that or huge adaptors that looked like gas fittings!:sick::banghead::sick: However, I came across a kit that you can buy that works the same way as 'Time-sert' inserts by replacing damaged or stripped threads by drilling and tapping the Bleed Screw hole with the special stepped drill and tap supplied with the kit. Here's the link:
Nipple Therapy Kit
I still had a feeling that there must be an easier way... especially as I had just watched "Apollo 13" a couple of days ago :roll::roll::roll: (Think man THINK!)... This is what I came up with;

NOTE: IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE ABS GET YOUR BRAKES SERVICED AND CHECKED BY A CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL...

1) After checking that the threads on the Caliper and Bleed Screw were clean and undamaged, I reasoned that it must be the Seat in the Caliper, where the Bleed Screw sits to create a seal. 99 times out of a hundred it's a simple and effective design that works well; however, sometimes they can be very temperamental and unforgiving, especially if you're a bit heavy handed on the tools - Caliper Aluminium 0, Steel Bleed Screw 1 - This can damage the 'Seating Face' in the Caliper allowing brake fluid to flow up and in-between the threads of the Bleeder and the Caliper resulting in the constant 'weeping' (literally).

2) I cleaned up the 45 degree chamfer on the Bleed Screw. VERY, VERY lightly using 2000 grade wet and dry and brake fluid and a bloody big magnifying lens/light

3) I measured the internal diameter of the bore where the Bleeder Valve screws into on the Caliper (6.72mm). My idea was to turn a pin that would fit the bore, with almost an interference fit with the highest point of the threads in the bore. I could use the bore as a guide for my turned pin to keep it 'true'/perpendicular to the Seating Face.

4) I turned up a pin with a 45 degree end that I then finished, polished - I considered heat treating the end but as I was using it on Aluminium it wasn't necessary.

View attachment 44252

5) I then used 'Autosol' as a lapping paste (I've used toothpaste before and it works very well). I was very careful to use only small amounts and take it very slowly. I made sure that the bore and Seating Face was spotless before I put the Bleed Valve back in, using dry cotton buds (my Mrs. has got some really good ones that have two different ends - round and pointed.) They are excellent for getting into tight spots. I then cleaned the bore out with fresh brake fluid. I wasn't too concerned about any 'Autosol' going down the hole of the bore as it's fairly viscous and I was OCD x 10 about how much I was using. This combined with flushing the system, I was confident that it would be OK.

View attachment 44256

After bolting everything up and re-bleeding the rear brake system, I am happy to report that It was 100% successful :thumbsup::thumbsup:

View attachment 44253

Cheers
T.
Oh! By the way. can anyone tell me the size and thread pitch of the FRONT Bleeder Screws/Valves. Thanks - (The rear Bleeder Screw/Valve is M8x1.25)


A side conversation Please! - How did you change to floor boards - ?? I have a 2016 Roadster
 

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